Self-assembled supercapacitor wires for e-textiles

Italian researchers have developed a supercapacitor from graphene and copper that can be integrated into fabrics Now that almost everyone has a smartphone, the race is on to find the ‘next big thing’. Thanks to recent improvements in materials and electronics, wearable technologies may well be it. From health and fitness tackers, to light-up jackets, the...


Forbes: June - July

First off, let me apologise profusely for my general slacking on the website-front. Things have been a little frantic lately – I’ll explain more in a separate post – but I’m desperately trying to catch up! So, to get me started, here are my Forbes posts from June and July – the links are embedded in each article title. JUNE Are...


Long-term in-vivo tests assesses the degradation of bone implants

In a two-year study, Austrian researchers have investigated the behaviour of magnesium-alloy implants in mammalian femurs Biodegradable implants in bone tissue have been attracting increasing interest in the last few years, thanks to the considerable advantage they have over iron and zinc-based ones. They function like a permanent implant initially, but degrade...


Zeolite nanocomposites: a new breed of fertiliser?

This story appeared in Materials Today in July. Adding nanoparticles to soil could improve its water retention and nutrient-release qualities, according to Pakistan researchers Synthetic fertilisers have never been more popular. Since the 1960s, the world’s use of nitrogen-based fertilisers has increased nine-fold, while the use of compounds based on...


One step closer to self-powered switchable glazing?

This article originally appeared in Materials Today in June. One step closer to self-powered switchable glazing? Windows that change transparency could be powered by photovoltaic solar cells, say Irish researchers. Look around your nearest city and you’ll see glass everywhere. In most large buildings, that glass is coated, so that it traps heat inside during...


Cleaning flue gas with nanotubes

This post originally appeared herehere, back in June: Cleaning flue gas with nanotubes A collaboration between US and Chinese researchers has investigated the use of titanate nanotubes in removing CO2 from flue gas. As of April 2016, the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Earth’s atmosphere had reached 404.08 ppm – the highest level in 400,000 years....


SATC in the Evening Standard

I wrote a feature for the Evening Standard that was published on 1 August – very, very exciting for a Londoner who has read that paper more times than I’m willing to admit. They also added it to their site too, though with a “2020” headline, which is SO SO WRONG. 2050 would be more like it. Anyway, you can see it here:...


Science and the City: T-1 month

Well. It’s all getting very, very real now. In one month, on 11 August, my city-inspired baby will be released into the world… or at least to Europe, Oz and NZ. The US publication date isn’t until 25 October, I’m afraid. But regardless of where you are, Science and the City is already available for pre-order –  just click one of...


Making metal wires – no heating required

Engineers from North Carolina State University, have developed a simple route to fabricating metallic wires at room temperature By their very nature, today’s electronic devices based on silicon and germanium are hard, stiff and unwieldy, but the rapid development of organic and polymer based circuits are beginning to change that. Producing flexible, conductive...


Forbes: May

Hi guys, My Forbes stories for May are below – the month had its highs and lows, but in general, I’m pretty happy with how my column is being received. Do you have any suggestions of urban topics I should cover? http://www.forbes.com/sites/lauriewinkless/2016/05/02/is-tomorrows-car-just-a-case-of-history-repeating-itself/ – this one was...